Category Archives: Bak Bak

Om Puri: His life, dreams, struggles and accomplishments in his own words

I used to work as a clerk at a government office in Punjab. I was paid a salary of Rs 600 per month. I decided to leave the job, and pursue a career in acting. I knew that irrespective of how I fared, I would do better than making six hundred rupees. So I quit the job. At the time, it was unheard of. Everybody wanted government jobs. I studied acting for five years, including a course at the National School of Drama (NSD) in Delhi, and only after I was certain that I had the requisite skill, I moved to Mumbai. But it took not less than thirteen years after I decided on pursuing a career in the film industry that stability finally found me.”

These are Om Puri’s words in an interview to me.

Om Puri had earlier sought bail after being accused of domestic violence. PTI

An internationally acclaimed actor, a Padma Shri recipient, one of the pioneers of the world of parallel cinema, a stellar performer whose versatility transcended borders – Om Puri, who breathed his last in his Mumbai home on Friday, bagged several credits during his celebrated career spanning over four decades. But behind the tales of glory was a man who, as per his own admission, had trained hard to acquire the skill he was distinguished for.

He had struggled hard to survive in Mumbai before the film industry let him carve his space.

My interaction with Mr Om Puri was on a morning in August, 2015. I was busy with research for my recently published book, ‘The Front Page Murders: Inside the Serial Killings that Shocked India.’ The book, which is the true story of a serial killer who would murder and hack Bollywood strugglers for wealth in Mumbai, 2012, required me to speak to film industry insiders about the Bollywood struggler life in Mumbai, their passion and its pitfalls.

My study took me to actor Om Puri, recipient of two national awards then, but a man of long-standing perseverance, his story barely told. Since I had been a senior crime correspondent with a leading national daily, availing Mr Puri’s mobile number through an entertainment journalist in the city was not a difficult task. But I knew that getting him to talk would be tricky. He was a Bollywoodwallah after all, and to journalists, no one has more dolled up egos than this breed of artists. I, however, was in for a surprise.

‘Haan ji,’ Mr Puri answered his phone.

After I introduced myself, inquiring if it was a good time to talk, Mr Puri informed that he was on his way somewhere, and would be happy to spare a few minutes. Pleasantly surprised, I rolled out my questions, and he gladly detailed.

Recollecting the time when he first moved to the city of slums and skyscrapers to chase his Bollywood dream, Puri said:

“I was 26 years old when I first came to Mumbai. I did not know anyone here except for actor Naseeruddin Shah. He was my senior at NSD. So upon reaching here, I went straight to him. He was living in a rented room then, and allowed me to stay with him for two weeks. We were sharing the room, but the landlady did not approve of it. I was staying as a guest, and wasn’t paying rent. So she took me out. Through a friend, Naseer then found a paying guest accommodation for me off Hill Road in Bandra. It was a bungalow, and I was given one room with only a cot, one almirah, a table, and a chair. That was 1976. I paid a rent of Rs 175 per month. One and a half years later, the landlady’s son got married. They wanted the room, and I had to move out.”

The veteran artist recollected that after leaving the bungalow, he approached a hostel in Bandra. However, the authorities were skeptical about letting him stay because they had a bad experience with an actor before, and didn’t allow accommodation to Bollywood aspirants anymore. Puri tried to convince them, saying that he wasn’t any other run-away in the city, whiling his time away, that he was extremely serious about his Bollywood dream, and was working hard towards it. But the hostel authorities wouldn’t budge.

I did not give up hope, and landed at the hostel every other week. I had to have a roof. Eventually, they agreed, and I stayed there for two years, sharing my room with another boy. Aakrosh released in 1981. The film was very well received by art producers, but it didn’t impress the film industry. I moved to several other places before Manmohan Shetty’s Ardh Satya was released in 1983. (Om Puri’s career took off with this film; he also won the National Film Award for Best Actor for this role.) Mr Shetty told me that he had a one-BHK flat lying vacant in Chembur, and that I should move there until I get my own place. Things were good thereafter – eight years after I moved to Mumbai, and thirteen years after I chose to pursue a career in acting.

During our conversation, Puri spoke extensively about how difficult the life of a Bollywood struggler is in Mumbai, how these men and women flock to the city with dreams of the silver screen, hopes of that one celluloid break, and how they end up getting exploited by men who have set up businesses only to cash on their innocent dreams.

Bollywood aspirants need to be careful about falling prey to criminal elements in Mumbai. They should only visit established offices, and not believe any random person who boasts of connections in the film industry. The struggler’s life is very difficult here.  When you come to the city with dreams of the film industry, the biggest problem is survival. Mumbai is an expensive city. When youngsters approach me for roles, the first thing I ask them is if they can afford staying in the city for at least a year without a stable income, if their families can afford it. If yes, they can go ahead and try their luck.

Talking about his own luck, Puri said that he had worked hard to turn fate in his favour.

“Bollywood aspirants usually come to this city, looking at people like us. And when they see someone like me, particularly, it gives them hope. They think ke yaar, Om Puri jaisa aadmi, jiske face pe daag hai, naak bada mota sa hai, Irfan Khan bhi koi aisa good-looking nahi lagta, agar yeh log kar sakte hai, toh hum toh inse better dikhte hai. (They think that if a man like Om Puri, who has spots all over his face, a fat nose, Irfan Khan is also not very good-looking, if they can make it, we are better looking than them.) But they don’t realise that we have worked hard to study acting before coming to Mumbai. I came here after training for five years.”

Although I haven’t spoken to the actor since this conversation, I know that he was proud of his eccentric looks, and his achievements in the face-obsessed film industry despite them.

“I have no regrets at all. I have done quite well for myself. I didn’t have a conventional face, but I have done well, and I am proud of it,” Puri wrote on Twitter a fortnight ago.

Nervous, but also very excited: Deepika Padukone on her Hollywood debut with Vin Diesel

Mumbai: Actress Deepika Padukone says she is nervous and excited about her Hollywood debut xXx: Return of Xander Cage that stars Vin Diesel.

“I am really excited. This is my Hollywood debut. I am very nervous, but I am also very excited. And today is the beginning to that journey. Hopefully, we will be coming to India soon,” Deepika said on 1 January before leaving for abroad to kick-start the film’s promotion.

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“In terms of promotion, first we will head to Mexico. As far as the release is concerned, we will first release the movie in India. While shooting the film, I discussed this with my unit… that it would be great to first release it in India and I am happy that it is finally happening,” she added.

After her Hollywood debut later this month, Deepika will be known for being more than a Bollywood actress.

Talking about it, she said: “I think I’d like to be known as a good person and a good actor. But I also feel very proud that I get to represent my country, especially in this kind of action franchise of the film.”

“I am really excited. I am also very sure we will enjoy this film because of its content. There is a lot of action, adventure in the film, which we have not seen in Indian films before. So, I can’t wait to bring this movie to India and show it to everyone.”

Shah Rukh Khan: ‘As an actor, I do not perform keeping awards in mind; it just happens

Mumbai: Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan, who launched the upcoming international film award titled ‘Indian Academy Awards’ says he loves awards and considers them the collective applause for his work.

Shah Rukh Khan. File photo/Solaris Images

“I love being a movie star and I love awards. After working for some time in the industry, we all reach a point from where we need some kind of applause and recognition. My awards are the collective applause for the work that I have done that year or on a film,” Shah Rukh told media here.

Khan added that in his opinion, none of his films so far in the vast body of his work is worthy of a National Award.

“If I haven’t got an award, I didn’t deserve it.. as an actor, I do not perform keeping any award in mind, it happens,” he added.

Indian Academy Awards, conceptualised by Brainstorm Entertainment and executed by Cineyug will held in California to celebrate world cinema of three major film industries — Bollywood, Tollywood and Hollywood.

Apart from Shah Rukh Khan, the event had Vandana Krishna, Saurabh Pandey of Brainstorm Entertainment, US Consul General Tom Vajda and Aly Morani from Cineyung.

Explaining the idea of celebrating cinema on such a huge platform, Shah Rukh, asking people not to compare it to the Oscars or any such awards, said: “Bollywood films are hugely respected by American artistes. Creating this kind of platform will help us to not only promote our Indian films of different industries, but also create awareness of our work.

“India is one of the old filmmaking countries of the world. So as a member of film industry, I feel it is our responsibility to educate people about our cinema that can resolve lot of misconception about Indian films.”

One of the unique factors of the award is film lovers’ participation. People can vote for their favorite films, stars in over 21 categories from the official website of Indian Academy Awards.

IAA founder Pandey said: “The Indian film industry is going global and the Indian Academy Awards is a celebration of that global, democratic academy that is completely transparent and all encompassing. Our aim with these awards is to bring a sense of realism and credibility to cinema awards in the Indian film industry. This is an academy that never sleeps.”

Vajda said: “We are very pleased to support the collaboration between the American and Indian film industries, in a way that recognises and promotes great talent and storytelling in movies. California is a perfect destination to showcase this for both American and Indian audiences”.

Indian Academy Awards will be a two days extravaganza of live performances by various superstars of Bollywood including Shah Rukh that will be choreographed by Shiamak Davar along with music and fashion shows on 7-8 July 2017 in Silicon Valley.

Kahaani 2 quick review: Vidya Balan is riveting in thriller that’s let down by its second half

Except for carrying forward the name of a character — ‘Vidya’ — for the first half of the movie, Sujoy Ghosh’s Kahaani 2 (also known as Kahaani 2: Durga Rani Singh) starring Vidya Balan and Arjun Rampal, is an entirely different movie from its predecessor in the franchise. The plot is new, so are the characters.

Vidya Balan in 'Kahaani 2: Durga Rani Singh'

Kahaani 2 is set in Kolkata and is the story of Durga Rani Singh, played by Vidya Balan, who has been accused of kidnapping a 6-year-old called Mili, and murdering her grandmother. There is a also a parallel life she leads as Vidya Sinha, who has a daughter named Mili. Confusing enough? You will have to watch the movie to find out how this plot plays out.

The movie revolves around child sexual abuse. The first half of the movie gives you all the possible thrills and chills as Durga Rani Singh sets out in a mission to rescue a child from a possible abuser.

This is one of those movies for which the trailer is a curse. Two of the most startling moments in the film lose all their shock factor if you’ve already watched the trailer, and that’s sad.

The movie also has Inspector Inderjit, played by Arjun Rampal. ‘Hot’, I’m sure is the correct terminology here. He is entirely convincing as an inspector who has been transferred to a small town and is waiting for a promotion so that he along with his family could shift back to the city.

The first half is gripping, and 100 percent entertaining. But the second half turns out to be slightly off track. While Sujoy Ghosh with his magical attention to detail has scripted out what was meant to be an amazing narrative, the second half drags, and is not as entertaining. The director also flavours the second half with subtle humour in the midst of intense moments. While I was with a theatreful of people laughing along at those subtleties, I felt like it might be taking the seriousness away from the issue of child sexual abuse. And the way CSA is dealt with in the movie is good, but not moving enough perhaps.

Powerful, strong and riveting, Vidya Balan gives a performance which is definitely worth watching multiple times. Arjun Rampal puts up a great show as well. The two childactors who play the character Mili are spot on. While the performances take Kahaani 2 a notch higher, a not-so-thoroughly thought out second half pulls it down.

Force 2 is a refreshing action film from John Abraham, despite its faux-patriotism

Right away let’s establish one thing, and this will likely hold true for a few years at least: Popular Indian cinema is going to milk patriotism and pride in the nation as much as it can, given the direction in which national discourse has swung. (Check your WhatsApp forwards for a quick confirmation.)

No genre of popular cinema is going to tap into this more than action entertainers, because nationalism is a natural ally of grandiose masculinity and brute physical power, attributes that we’re trying to ascribe to a nation we, strangely enough, call our ‘Motherland’.

Expectedly, given that it gets to play with a big action star as a cop, Force 2 does it with élan.

At one point John Abraham’s ACP Yashvardhan declares that the days are gone when India couldn’t carry out covert operations on foreign soil. ‘Ab hum ghus ke maarte hain’, he exclaims. Translation: ‘Now, we barge in and kill our enemies!’ (Does anyone else feel that ‘surgical strike’ has the potential to be a smashing new drinking game? Surely we deserve a pun on ‘shot’.)

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Once you accept that we’re going to see this quite often now — at least until India (as a collective consciousness) has more important things to worry about than projecting a strong masculine image to the world — and once you accept that cinema is going to assimilate popular culture in order to maximise footfalls and profit, you might just find Force 2 to be a refreshingly decent actioner, unlike the ludicrously overcooked action films Hindi cinema in particular frequently subjects us to. (I’m looking at you, Dilwale and Shivaay.)

For starters, Force 2 is set in a world where everyone doesn’t speak Hindi (imagine). The film is based primarily in Budapest, and mercifully, Hungarians and other foreign nationals in the film get to keep their language and not converse in awkward Hindi with the Indian lead pair. The foreign language lines are subtitled in Hindi, which is encouraging. It’s a sign of not taking the audience for granted, while also ensuring that the audience does not remain a passive viewer throughout. (In general, this would be a good time to brush up on our Hindi reading abilities, please note.)

This trait, of not taking the audience for granted, runs through the film.

The plot itself is standard international espionage fare for a seasoned viewer of Hollywood’s self-aggrandising CIA movies. (Stories of the CIA blatantly using Hollywood, for something that goes beyond even propaganda, make for a fun read if you love conspiracy theories.) However, beyond that, the film actually does a good job of not dumbing everything down.

In fact, Force 2 can well be compared with any commercial film with an espionage backdrop from anywhere in the world, and it would hold its own because at the heart of it, the film’s intent is clear. There exist different types of patriotism, and even service to one’s nation cannot be seen through a monochrome  prism. It blurs the lines between what we call ‘massy’ and ‘classy’, keeps the setting contemporary, and serves up a fairly engaging plot all the way till the end.

Credit for this must go to director Abhinay Deo, who has always displayed a sensibility that is far more evolved than most other filmmakers. Incidentally, he happens to be one of India’s finest advertising filmmakers. He has made plenty ads over the years that showcase his ability to use the visual medium effectively without having to spell everything out. Watch one particular scene early in the film, where an Indian RAW agent is assassinated while riding a motorbike. It is a brutal scene that eschews gore in favour of pure imagery to make its point.

The hiccups in Force 2’s screenplay mostly come from trying to straddle that line between what’s right and what sells, and this is something even the most hardened cynic must grant to at least the producer of the film.

So, you have an Indian police officer appointing himself for a mission abroad involving the death of RAW agents. You have a perfectly made-up woman, from RAW no less, who partners with him on this mission. And you have a charming, baby-faced villain who oozes snarky charm. A few convenient liberties here and there are bumps in a film that otherwise keeps you interested for the most.

A special mention for John Abraham here.

The man does best in roles where he doesn’t have to emote, so he sticks to them. Back in 2013, when the Congress was in power, he co-produced and starred in Madras Café, which took a more than sympathetic view of (if not one that was downright in favour of) Rajiv Gandhi. This year alone, he has had Dishoom and Force 2, both of which firmly take a position aligned with the current government’s rhetoric.

Here’s a man who plays his cards right, and it explains why he’s still able to continuously churn out films as producer and solo lead, even if some of them don’t emerge winners at the box office.

Credit for Force 2 must go to the man who is at the receiving end of enough jokes about his acting talent, or lack thereof. Yes, we’re still a long way off from giving the world a global action film that we can be proud of, but Force 2 seems like a surgical baby-strike in the right direction.

Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge to Ae Dil Hai Mushkil: Bollywood loves naming films after hit songs

Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge still runs successfully at Maratha Mandir today. What runs along with it in the film industry, are all the DDLJ clichés that the film gave birth to, in 1995. The train sequence, lovers running and uniting in the fields and the girl’s furious father letting go of his daughter in the climax – all these scenes became historic and, in turn, the formula for all commercial entertainers.

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil borrows its title from the Johnny Walker's iconic song from the 1956 film CID.

An unnoticed trend or formula that Aditya Chopra’s film injected into the veins of the industry was that of dedicating the title of the film to the name of a famous song. Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge was the name of a song from Yash Raj Films’ 1974 movie Chor Machaye Shor starring Mumtaz and Shashi Kapoor.

Chopra, who was just four years old at the time of the release of the film, is likely to have imbibed the dialogues, scenes and songs of his legendary father Yash Chopra’s films. Thus, while selecting a title of his directorial debut, he chose one of the famous songs that he grew up listening to. The title fit into the context of the film aptly as well.

What followed was a trend of naming films after famous songs as a formula, on the director’s part, to replicate DDLJ’s momentous success. One of the first attempts at executing the formula was in the 1998 Sohail Khan directorial Pyar Kiya Toh Darna Kya starring Salman Khan and Kajol.

The film could have been named anything else but Khan chose to bank on the popularity of the legendary song from K Asif’s 1960 historical drama Mughal-e-Aazam. The film emerged successful and the trend of naming films after famous songs continued.

While intertextuality was not a new phenomenon in Hindi cinema, these allusions to popular songs gained traction as a mere market trend. There were several instances when the title of the film had little to do with the story but was used nonetheless as the song it was named after had immense recall value among its target group.

For example, Samir Karnik’s 2011 comedy Yamla Pagla Deewana was named so to attract the fans of Dharmendra to cinema halls. The film was nothing more than an ode to the revered actor and the fact that he was sharing the screen space with his sons Sunny and Bobby Deol for the first time. The right packaging, in which the title played a crucial role, ensured the film was a huge success at the box office, though it was panned by the film critics.

Similarly, after Ranbir Kapoor had a flawed launch vehicle in Saawariya, Yash Raj Films decided to capitalise on their own formula when they re-launched Kapoor through the film Bachna Ae Haseeno, named after his father Rishi Kapoor’s iconic song from the 1977 action film Hum Kisi Se Kum Naheen. The film worked and launched the fourth generation star in the process. Incidentally, another film of Ranbir, Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani was named after the title song of his uncle Randhir Kapoor’s 1972 film Jawani Diwani. The titles of the two films were in tune with Ranbir’s characters but at the same time, they indicated the fact that Ranbir is carrying forward his family legacy.

There were a few films which took their titles from popular songs but presented it in an entirely new light. The most recent example is Karan Johar’s Ae Dil Hai Mushkil. The title is inspired from Johnny Walker’s historic song from the 1956 film CID. Though the context of that song was the trials that one faces while making his ends meet in Mumbai, Johar’s version turned into an anthem for unrequited lovers.

Another good example is Farah Khan’s Om Shanti Om, which was a complete detour from Rishi Kapoor’s song from the 1980 thriller Karz. Though both the films were based on the theme of reincarnation, the title had little to do with the coincidence. It alluded to the characters of the film, Shantipriya and the two incarnations of Om.

Another interesting example is Rakesh Roshan’s Koi Mil Gaya. The title referred to a dance number in Johar’s Kuch Kuch Hota Hai. Since the song was a children’s favourite, Roshan decided to name the film after the song to please his target group. However, the rationale behind the title was not superficial as unlike the song it was named after, the ‘koi’ in the song did not refer to first love but to an extra-terrestrial creature.

Roshan’s 2003 fantasy film came just six years after Johar’s film so the song had good recall value by then. Similarly, films like Guzaarish and Jai Ho also followed the same path as they banked on the popularity of recent hit songs from Ghajini and Slumdog Millionaire. Though Sanjay Leela Bhansali added depth to the title of Guzaarish by addressing the issue of euthanasia, Sohail Khan changed the name of his film from Mental to Jai Ho after AR Rahman won an Academy Award for composing the renowned song sung by Sukhwinder Singh.

As the trend continues with upcoming films like Meri Pyari Bindu and Raabta, we are yet to see whether these films hold any titular relevance or are merely spin offs of popular songs with good recall value.

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil speeds to 100-cr mark; Shivaay picks up on day 4: Box office report

Diwali has long been a coveted box office slot for Bollywood filmmakers, with its potential to draw in the festive/holiday audience.

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil has pulled ahead of Shivaay in their box office battle

But the two high-profile Diwali releases this year — Karan Johar’s Ae Dil Hai Mushkil and Shivaay — haven’t given the industry as much of a boost as expected.

In fact, the joint collection of both films by the end of their opening weekend (Rs 64.16 crore), is reportedly the lowest in six years — and by a substantial margin.

“Diwali puja and festivities made a dent in the business of Ae Dil Hai Mushkil and Shivaay on Sunday. Business should witness an upward trend on Monday and Tuesday,” tweeted trade analyst Taran Adarsh.

Distributor Joginder Mahajan told IANS: “People are more inclined towards festivities during Diwali. So these collections are good for both films. The crucial days will be Monday and Tuesday.”

Of the two films, both of which released on Friday (28 October), Ae Dil Hai Mushkil has pulled ahead with a comfortable margin.

Opening collections: 

Shivaay‘s opening weekend collection (ending Sunday, 30 October) came to Rs 28.56 crore, trade reports confirmed.

Taran Adarsh and trade publication KoiMoi.com confirmed these numbers for Shivaay’s domestic box office collections over the three days — Friday: 10.24 crore; Saturday: 10.06 crore; Sunday: 8.26 crore.

In contrast, Ae Dil Hai Mushkil registered domestic weekend collections of Rs 35.60 crore.

At Rs 13.30 crore on Friday, ADHM gave Ranbir Kapoor and Anushka Sharma the third highest opening figures of their careers so far, and collections stayed strong on Saturday, at Rs 13.10 crore.

Just like Shivaay, ADHM too saw a drop in collections on Sunday, to Rs 9.20 crore.

Karan Johar is a soft target: India is actually a sad tale of an unequal democracy

Filmmaker Karan Johar must be a very confused man these days.

In a country where he enjoys the same rights as others, how can outfits, political and otherwise, of small consequence hold his business interests to ransom with such ease? How on earth would he know that India’s relations with Pakistan would nosedive a year later and make decisions accordingly now?

He can make movies, provide employment to a lot of people, entertain a huge audience, make money and make richer everyone down the value chain, but how is he supposed to handle it when theatre owners decide not to screen his movie on a whim or under pressure?

He is a soft target. Like so many others of his ilk and the creative community. He is an influential, even powerful, person in the film industry. But it is soft power he wields, not the real power – of muscle and ability to carry out threats – that counts, and is grudgingly respected in the country.

He cannot vandalise theatres, unleash a few hundred men to tear down posters or stage rallies and issue warning to artistes. He can direct a movie sending a subtle message to a world getting paranoid over terror and Islamophobic, but he cannot terrorise people. He would like to mind his work.

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While minding his work, he would expect a few constants. Respite from hassles not connected to his work is one of them. He would like his business interests protected too. If he is threatened in any way, he would expect the police to be of help. If there’s a dispute of some other kind he would like to knock the doors of the judiciary. These are the avenues open to him, like to any other Indian. If there’s no help from these two, he is helpless. He can only be at the mercy of extra-constitutional powers.

That’s what separates people like Karan Johar and say, someone like Raj Thackeray, chief of Maharashtra Navirman Sena, and makes him so unequal in the democracy ours. Leaders of outfits with local or limited interest command people who can carry out dire threats, make trade unions stop work and owners of theatres drop the idea of screening a movie.

They only need an issue with emotional content. It could be anything – patriotism, nationalism and any matter relating to religion, region and culture.

Thus we have organisations attacking pubs, killing rationalists, raiding libraries, threatening writers, harassing women in short skirts, destroying art work in exhibitions, branding people anti-national, snooping on food in hotels and what not. The list of targets can be unending.

Since intimidation is the accepted language of conversation among these people, polite dialogue or conversation is out of question. Backed as they are by political powers, the law looks the other way when they are in action. They virtually go scot-free every time, encouraged thus to carry out their next offensive without much worry.

Where does that leave Karan Johar or by extension us? Johar’s problem is he could be targeted at multiple points, right from the stage of shooting to where his movie would be screened. People at different points can be ‘managed’in different ways and he can hardly do anything about it.

Others are more fortunate that way. Still that does not take away the helplessness we are exposed to. What is more worrisome is earlier these attacks or threats used to be irregular; the frequency of the activities of such groups over the last couple of years has made it a trend. There’s more violence and tendency to coerce in the air.

Can we be assured of protection from these people? When the ruling establishment go indifferent and other political parties play the game of opportunism it is virtually impossible. It is one of the existential crises we face now. Wielders of rough, crude power are overwhelming those commanding soft power. It’s a mockery of the idea of all Indians being equal.

Jim Carrey in wrongful death suit filed by ex-girlfriend Cathriona White’s former husband

Veteran comic actor Jim Carrey was sued Monday for allegedly procuring drugs under a bogus name for his ex-girlfriend, who died of an overdose last year, and then trying to hide his involvement.

According to the suit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court by Mark Burton, the estranged husband of Carrey’s former girlfriend Cathriona White, the actor “used his immense wealth and celebrity status” to obtain opioids for her.

Burton alleges that the actor purchased the drugs under the fake name “Arthur King” and then “took steps to conceal and obfuscate his involvement and culpability” after White’s death.

Jim Carrey. Image from AP

Carrey’s attorney, prominent celebrity lawyer Marty Singer, dismissed the suit on Monday as nothing but a bid by Burton to extort money from the actor.

The celebrity website TMZ quoted Singer as saying White “stole” Carrey’s prescription medication and that he never gave her any pills.

“There are moments in life when you have to stand up and defend your honour against the evil in this world,” TMZ quoted Carrey as saying in a statement. “I will not tolerate this heartless attempt to exploit me, or the woman I loved.”

The suit alleges that Carrey was obsessed with controlling and manipulating the 30-year-old woman with whom he had an on-again, off-again relationship since 2012 and was able to monitor surveillance cameras at a home in the Los Angeles area where White often stayed.

The actor and his assistant were allegedly aware that White had not left the home for well over a day in September, when she died, but failed to act.

News reports at the time said that she and Carrey had broken up a few days before her death.

White sent a cryptic message on her Twitter account on the day the couple reportedly broke up that read: “Signing off Twitter, I hope I have been a light to my nearest and dearest.”

According to the coroner’s office, White took her own life by overdosing on a lethal amount of prescription drugs including Ambien, Propranolol and Percocet.

The suit alleges that three pill bottles found near the body of the Irish-born makeup artist bore the name “Arthur King”.

Carrey allegedly obtained the drugs from a physician who routinely prescribed them to the actor under the false name.

The suit claims that the Canadian-born comedian tried to cover up his tracks by sending a “bogus text message” to White on 27 September, when she was already dead, enquiring as to the whereabouts of the drugs.

Burton also claims the actor engaged in a “charade” after White’s death, reneging on his offer to pay for funeral expenses.

The lawsuit seeks unspecified damages as well as reimbursement for funeral expenses and attorney fees.

Carrey served as a pallbearer at White’s burial in her hometown in Ireland and wrote a tribute after her death describing her as a “truly kind and delicate Irish flower”.

Emraan Hashmi talks about that Aishwarya Rai ‘rift’ and Raaz Reboot’s censor troubles

If talk in B-town is to be believed, then the reason Emraan Hashmi and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan will not be starring together in Baadshaho is because of a statement the former made on the Koffee with Karan chat show two years ago, when he called the actress “plastic”.

Emraan Hashmi. Image from IBN

While one may have assumed that the two parties would have moved on from the incident considering all the time that’s passed, rumours would have otherwise: we hear that in June this year, Aishwarya was one of the first actresses to be approached for Milan Luhtria’s Baadshaho, which stars Hashmi alongside Ajay Devgn. However, she reportedly turned down the role (said to be inspired by Maharani Gayatri Devi) once she found out that several of her scenes would be opposite Hashmi. Sources claimed that the actress hadn’t forgotten the “plastic” jibe he’d levelled at her.

Emraan Hashmi — who is currently busy promoting his erotic horror thriller Raaz Reboot — has laughed off those reports.

“I don’t know who was approached for the role of the leading lady but it’s like going back into history… that (the remark on Koffee With Karan) was two years ago. The statement was made in jest and it’s all for the hamper [laughs]. I am a big fan ofAishwarya Rai   and if I meet her I will definitely apologise because there was nothing personal (to it),” Emraan told Firstpost.

He adds with a laugh, “Karan just nudges you and makes you say these things. To win a hamper makes you greedy and makes you do such foolish things.” He continues, “I have no idea whether she refused the film because of my statement — that only the makers and people who approached her know. Lot of actors are approached for a role. I haven’t had the chance to meet her. She would have forgotten this incident but obviously she was reminded of it because of articles in newspapers.”

Meanwhile, the Central Bureau of Film Certification has raised issues with some of the sequences in Raaz Reboot. While there have been reports that the film was cleared with an ‘A’ certificate with no cuts, Emraan revealed that the entire truth was not told: “Actually the information given out was wrong. Everything was not cleared by the CBFC, there were few omissions, which I don’t know why, never came out. The film got an ‘A’ certificate not because of erotica — which happens with most of my films — but it’s got more to do with the visual impact of the horror scenes and probably it’s not suitable for audience under 18. I’m happy with an ‘A’ certificate but what is upsetting is that certain cuss words were deleted, then the word ‘b***h’ was omitted. I fail to understand why they’re fine with retaing a few mentions of the word f**k in the film, but not b***h. I can’t figure out any logic to it. And why chop cuss words when the film has an ‘A’ certificate?” Hashmi wonders.

When we spoke with producer Mahesh Bhatt about the elements the CBFC wanted ‘toned down’ in Raaz Reboot, he said: “Even the Hollywood film Exorcist had women suddenly breaking into profanities and abuses. It shocks the viewer and makes you feel that this person has been possessed by something that is evil. The censors came down heavily on this sequence in our film but we stuck to our guns, and finally, it was the cuss words that were reduced — which I found absurd. Whether I say f**k five times or 10 times, what difference does it make? It’s a good person possessed by evil force who is saying f**k, a word that is commonly used in our social space.”

Bhatt added, “It (what gets passed and what doesn’t) all depends upon the mood of the CBFC members and their interpretation of guidelines. They know that the producer is vulnerable. He has his back against the wall and there is a clock ticking, with promotions heading to an all time high. The CBFC is in the Dark Ages, there is the demon of regression which somebody must vanquish, and only then we can have a freer and better cinema.”